TED日本語 - サケナ・ヤクービ: 学校を閉鎖しようとするタリバンを、私がどう阻止したか

TED日本語

TED Talks(英語 日本語字幕付き動画)

TED日本語 - サケナ・ヤクービ: 学校を閉鎖しようとするタリバンを、私がどう阻止したか

TED Talks

学校を閉鎖しようとするタリバンを、私がどう阻止したか
How I stopped the Taliban from shutting down my school
サケナ・ヤクービ
Sakena Yacoobi

内容

タリバンがアフガニスタンの女子校をすべて閉鎖した頃、サケナ・ヤクービは、密かに新たな学校を開いて数千人の男女を教育し始めました。彼女が力強く、軽妙に語るのは、教えるのをやめるよう迫られた2度の驚くべき体験談、そして、愛する祖国の再建に向けたビジョンです。

Script

(Arabic) I seek refuge in Allah from cursed Satan. In the Name of Allah, the most Gracious, the most Merciful.

(English) I was born in a middle class family. My father was five years old when he lost his father, but by the time I was born, he was already a businessman. But it didn't make a difference to him if his children were going to be a boy or a girl: they were going to go to school. So I guess I was the lucky one.

My mother had 16 pregnancies. From 16 pregnancies,five of us are alive. You can imagine as a child what I went through. Day to day, I watched women being carried to a graveyard, or watched children going to a graveyard. At that time, when I finished my high school, I really wanted to be a doctor. I wanted to be a doctor to help women and children. So I completed my education, but I wanted to go to university. Unfortunately, in my country, there wasn't a dormitory for girls, so I was accepted in medical school, but I could not go there. So as a result, my father sent me to America.

I came to America. I completed my education. While I was completing my education, my country was invaded by Russia. And do you know that at the time I was completing my education, I didn't know what was going on with my family or with my country. There were months, years, I didn't know about it. My family was in a refugee camp. So as soon as I completed my education, I brought my family to America. I wanted them to be safe.

But where was my heart? My heart was in Afghanistan. Day after day, when I listened to the news, when I followed what was going on with my country, my heart was breaking up. I really wanted to go back to my country, but at the same time I knew I could not go there, because there was no place for me. I had a good job. I was a professor at a university. I earned good money. I had a good life. My family was here. I could live with them. But I wasn't happy. I wanted to go back home. So I went to the refugee camp. And when I went to the refugee camp in Pakistan, there were 7.5 million refugees. 7.5 million refugees. About 90 percent of them were women and children. Most of the men have been killed or they were in war. And you know, in the refugee camp, when I went day-to-day to do a survey, I found things you never could imagine. I saw a widow with five to eight children sitting there and weeping and not knowing what to do. I saw a young woman have no way to go anywhere, no education, no entertainment, no place to even live. I saw young men that had lost their father and their home, and they are supporting the family as a 10-to-12-year old boy -- being the head of the household, trying to protect their sister and their mother and their children.

So it was a very devastating situation. My heart was beating for my people, and I didn't know what to do. At that moment, we talk about momentum. At that moment, I felt, what can I do for these people? How could I help these people? I am one individual. What can I do for them?

But at that moment, I knew that education changed my life. It transformed me. It gave me status. It gave me confidence. It gave me a career. It helped me to support my family, to bring my family to another country, to be safe. And I knew that at that moment that what I should give to my people is education and health, and that's what I went after.

But do you think it was easy? No, because at that time, education was banned for girls, completely. And also, by Russia invading Afghanistan, people were not trusting anyone. It was very hard to come and say, "I want to do this." Who am I? Somebody who comes from the United States. Somebody who got educated here. Did they trust me? Of course not.

So I really needed to build the trust in this community. How am I going to do that? I went and surveyed and looked and looked. I asked. Finally, I found one man. He was 80 years old. He was a mullah. I went to his tent in the camp, and I asked him, "I want to make you a teacher." And he looked at me, and he said, "Crazy woman, crazy woman, how do you think I can be a teacher?" And I told him, "I will make you a teacher." Finally, he accepted my offer, and once I started a class in his compound, the word spread all over. In a matter of one year, we had 25 schools set up,15,000 children going to school, and it was amazing.

(Applause)

Thank you. Thank you.

But of course, we're doing all our work, we were giving teacher training. We were training women's rights, human rights, democracy, rule of law. We were giving all kinds of training. And one day, I tell you,one day I was in the office in Peshawar, Pakistan. All of a sudden, I saw my staff running to rooms and locking the doors and telling me, "Run away, hide!" And you know, as a leader, what do you do? You're scared. You know it's dangerous. You know your life is on the line. But as a leader, you have to hold it together. You have to hold it together and show strength. So I said, "What's going on?" And these people were pouring into my office. So I invited them to the office. They came, and there were nine of them -- nine Taliban. They were the ugliest looking men you can ever see.

(Laughter)

Very mean-looking people, black clothes, black turban, and they pour into my office. And I invited them to have a seat and have tea. They said no. They are not going to drink tea. And of course, with the tone of voice they were using, it was very scary, but I was really shaking up. But also I was strong, holding myself up. And, of course, by that time, you know how I dress -- I dress from head to toe in a black hijab. The only thing you could see, my eyes. They asked me, "What are you doing? Don't you know that school is banned for girls? What are you doing here?" And you know, I just looked at them, and I said, "What school? Where is the school?"

(Laughter)

(Applause)

And they look at my face, and they said, "You are teaching girls here." I said, "This is a house of somebody. We have some students coming, and they are all learning Koran, Holy Book. And you know, Koran says that if you learn the Holy Book, the woman, they can be a good wife, and they can obey their husband."

(Laughter)

And I tell you one thing: that's the way you work with those people, and you know --

(Laughter)

So by that time, they started speaking Pashto. They talked to each other, and they said, "Let's go, leave her alone, she's OK." And you know, this time, I offered them tea again, and they took a sip and they laughed. By that time, my staff poured into my office. They were scared to death. They didn't know why they didn't kill me. They didn't know why they didn't take me away. But everybody was happy to see me. Very happy, and I was happy to be alive, of course.

(Laughter)

Of course, I was happy to be alive. But also, as we continuously gave training during the fall of the Taliban -- of course during the Taliban there is another story. We went underground and we provided education for 80 schoolgirls,3,000 students underground, and continuously we trained.

With the fall of the Taliban, we went into the country, and we opened school after school. We opened women's learning center. We continuously opened clinics. We worked with mothers and children. We had reproductive health training. We had all kinds of training that you can imagine. I was very happy. I was delighted with the outcome of my work. And one day, with four trainers and one bodyguard, I was going up north of Kabul, and all of a sudden, again, I was stopped in the middle of the road by 19 young men. Rifles on their shoulders, they blocked the road. And I told my driver, "What's going on?" And the driver said, "I don't know." He asked them. They said, "We have nothing to do with you." They called my name. They said, "We want her." My bodyguard got out, said, "I can answer you. What do you want?" They said, "Nothing." They called my name. And by that time, the women are yelling and screaming inside the car. I am very shaken up, and I told myself, this is it. This time, we all are going to be killed. There is no doubt in my mind. But still, the moment comes, and you take strength from whatever you believe and whatever you do. It's in your heart. You believe in your worth, and you can walk on it.

So I just hold myself on the side of the car. My leg was shaking, and I got outside. And I asked them, "What can I do for you?" You know what they said to me? They said, "We know who you are. We know where you are going. Every day you go up north here and there. You train women, you teach them and also you give them an opportunity to have a job. You build their skills. How about us?"

(Laughter)

(Applause)

"And you know, how about us? What are we going to do?" I looked at them, and I said, "I don't know."

(Laughter)

They said, "It's OK. The only thing we can do, what we know, from the time we're born, we just hold the gun and kill. That's all we know." And you know what that means. It's a trap to me, of course. So I walk out of there. They said, "We'll let you go, go." And so I walked into the car, I sit in the car, and I told the driver, "Turn around and go back to the office." At that time, we only were supporting girls. We only had money for women to train them, to send them to school, and nothing else.

By the time I came to the office, of course my trainers were gone. They ran away home. Nobody stayed there. My bodyguard was the only one there, and my voice was completely gone. I was shaken up, and I sat on my table, and I said, "What am I going to do?" How am I going to solve this problem? Because we had training going on up north already. Hundreds of women were there coming to get training.

So I was sitting there, all of a sudden, at this moment, talking about momentum, we are, at that moment,one of my wonderful donors called me about a report. And she asked me, "Sakena?" And I answered her. She said, "It's not you. What's wrong with you?" I said, "Nothing." I tried to cover. No matter what I tried to do, she didn't believe me, and she asked me again. "OK, tell me what's going on?" I told her the whole story. At that time, she said, "OK, you go next time, and you will help them. You will help them." And when,two days later, I went the same route, and do you know, they were not in here, they were a little back further, the same young men, standing up there and holding the rifle and pointing to us to stop the car. So we stopped the car. I got out. I said, "OK, let's go with me." And they said, "Yes." I said, "On one condition, that whatever I say, you accept it." And they said, yes, they do. So I took them to the mosque, and to make a long story short, I told them I'd give them teachers. Today, they are the best trainers. They learn English, they learn how to be teachers, they learn computers, and they are my guides. Every area that is unknown to us in the mountain areas, they go with me. They are ahead, and we go. And they protect us. And --

(Applause)

Thank you.

(Applause)

That tells you that education transforms people. When you educate people, they are going to be different, and today all over, we need to work for gender equality. We can not only train women but forget about the men, because the men are the real people who are giving women the hardest time.

(Laughter)

So we started training men because the men should know the potential of women, know how much these potential men has, and how much these women can do the same job they are doing. So we are continuously giving training to men, and I really believe strongly. I live in a country that was a beautiful country. I just want to share this with you. It was a beautiful country, beautiful, peaceful country. We were going everywhere. Women were getting education: lawyer, engineer, teacher, and we were going from house to house. We never locked our doors. But you know what happened to my country. Today, people can not walk out of their door without security issues. But we want the same Afghanistan we had before. And I want to tell you the other side. Today, the women of Afghanistan are working very, very hard. They are earning degrees. They are training to be lawyers. They are training to be doctors, back again. They are training to be teachers, and they are running businesses. So it is so wonderful to see people like that reach their complete potential, and all of this is going to happen.

I want to share this with you, because of love, because of compassion, and because of trust and honesty. If you have these few things with you, you will accomplish. We have one poet, Mawlana Rumi. He said that by having compassion and having love, you can conquer the world. And I tell you, we could. And if we could do it in Afghanistan, I am sure 100 percent that everyone can do it in any part of the world.

Thank you very, very much.

(Applause)

Thank you. Thank you.

(Applause)

(アラビア語)悪魔に対しアッラーの庇護を 慈悲あまねく慈愛深きアッラーの御名において

私は中流家庭に生まれました 私の父は5歳の時に 自分の父を亡くしましたが 私が生まれた頃には 実業家になっていました でもそんなこととは関係なく 父は 自分の子どもが男でも女でも 学校へ通わせるつもりでした だから 私は運が良かったんだと思います

母は16回妊娠しました その内 5人だけが生き延びました 私の子ども時代の体験を 想像できると思います 毎日のように 墓地に運ばれる女性や 子どもたちを 目にしていました 私は 高校を卒業する頃には 医師を目指すようになりました 医師になって 母親や子どもたちを 救いたかったんです だから学校を卒業してから さらに大学に進みたいと思いました でも残念ながら 私の国には 女子寮がなく 医大に合格しましたが 通うことはできませんでした だから父は 私をアメリカに 留学させてくれたんです

こうしてアメリカにやってきました 学校も卒業しました もうすぐ卒業という時に 祖国はロシアに侵略されました 学校に通っていた時は 家族や祖国が どうなっているのか 私には知る由もありませんでした 何か月も 何年も 知らずにいたんです 家族は難民キャンプにいました だから 卒業するとすぐに 家族をアメリカに 呼び寄せたんです 家族の安全を願ってのことでした

でも心の奥には 祖国アフガニスタンがありました 毎日のようにニュースを聞き 祖国で何が起こっているかを 知るにつれ 心は張り裂けそうでした 本当に国に戻りたかったけれど 戻れないことも わかっていました 私の居場所は なかったからです 私はいい仕事に就いていました 大学の教授をしていたんです 給料もよく いい暮らしをしていました 家族は身近にいて 一緒に暮らすことができました でも私は満足できませんでした 故郷に戻りたかったんです それで難民キャンプに行きました パキスタンの難民キャンプに行くと 750万人もの難民がいました 750万人ですよ 難民のおよそ9割は女性と子どもでした 男性はほとんど 殺されたか 戦争に出ていました 難民キャンプに 毎日 調査に行きましたが 想像を絶する場面を目にしました ある未亡人は 子どもが5~8人もいるのに ただ座って泣いていました 途方に暮れていたのです 行く当てのない若い女性も見ました 教育も 娯楽も 住む場所さえもなかったのです 父親も家も失った男の子たちを見ました 10~12歳なのに家族を支えています 一家の大黒柱として 妹や母親や その子どもたちを 守ろうとしていたのです

これは とても衝撃的な状況でした 私が同胞のためを思っていても どうしたらいいか わからなかった・・・ その時 きっかけを得ました その時 私は感じました 彼らのために 何ができるんだろう? どう手を差し伸べればいいんだろう? 一個人に過ぎない私に 何ができるんだろう?

その時 気づいたんです 私の人生を変えたのは教育だと 教育が 私を変え 私に社会的地位を与えてくれました 教育が 私に自信と 職業を与えてくれました 私が家族を支え 外国に呼び寄せて 安全でいられるようにできたのも 教育のおかげです その時 気づいたのです 私が祖国の人々に与えるべきなのは 教育と健康で 私が追求していたのは それなんだと

簡単だったと思いますか? とんでもない 当時 女子教育は完全に禁止されていたんです それにロシアの アフガニスタン侵攻のせいで 国民は 誰も信用していませんでした 「自分はこうしたいんだ」と 口にしづらい状況だったのです そもそも 私は何者か? アメリカからやって来た人間です アメリカで教育を受けた人間です 信頼してもらえるでしょうか? どう考えても無理です

だから地域の信頼を築いていく 必要がありました では どうすればいいか? 私は現地で調査をし 丹念に調べていきました 質問もしました そしてついに ある男性に出会いました その人は80歳で イスラム法に通じた人「ムッラー」でした 私はキャンプにある 彼のテントに行き こう頼みました 「先生になってくれませんか」 すると 彼は私を見ながら言いました 「おかしな女だ なんで私が先生なんかになれると 思うんだ?」 私は言いました 「私があなたを先生にするんです」 結局 彼が提案を受け入れてくれ 敷地で授業を始めると 噂はそこらじゅうに広まりました そして わずか1年ほどで 私たちは25校の学校を設立し 1万5千人の子どもたちが そこに通うようになりました 本当に素晴らしいことでした

(拍手)

ありがとう ありがとう

当然 私たちはあらゆる仕事をしました 教員養成をしていましたし 女性の権利や人権 民主主義や法規の授業をしました あらゆる授業をしていました そんな ある日のこと 私はパキスタンの ペシャワールの事務所にいました すると突然 職員が大急ぎで 部屋の鍵をかけて回るのが見えました そして私に言うんです 「逃げて 隠れて!」 ここでリーダーとして何をすべきか? 恐怖にかられ 危険が迫っているのがわかります 命の危機に晒されていることも でもリーダーなら しっかりしなければなりません しっかりして 強さを示さねばならないんです そこで私は「どうしたの?」と言いました その時 男たちが 事務所になだれ込んできました 私は彼らを招き入れました やって来たのは 9人のタリバン兵で 実に酷い人相の男たちでした

(笑)

陰険な顔つきで 黒い服に黒いターバンを着け 事務所に入ってきたんです 「座ってお茶でもどうぞ」と 私は言いました でも男たちは応じませんでした 彼らが声を張り上げるので 私は当然 恐ろしくなりましたが 気合を入れました 気をしっかり持って じっと立っていました その時 私が着ていたのは 頭からつま先まである 黒のヒジャーブでした 見えるのは私の目だけでした 男たちが私を問い詰めます 「お前は何をしている? 女子の学校は禁止されているのを 知らないのか? ここで何をしているんだ?」 私は彼らを見据えて言いました 「学校って何ですか? どこにそんなものが?」

(笑)

(拍手)

男たちは私の顔を見て 言いました 「ここで女を教育しているんだろう」 「ここは誰か知らない人の家です 学生は何人か来ますが みんなコーランを学んでいます コーランにもあります 『聖典を学べば 女たちは 良き妻となり 夫に従うであろう』と」

(笑)

1つ言えることは こういう連中は こうあしらうべきです

(笑)

すると男たちは パシュトウ語で話し始めました そして話し合った後 言いました 「この女は放っておこう こいつは大丈夫だ」 この時 私はもう一度 お茶をすすめました 彼らはお茶を飲んで 笑いました その時 職員がみんな 事務所に入って来ました 全員ひどく怖がっていました 私が殺されたり 連れ去られたりしなかった 理由が分からなかったようです ただ みんな私を見てほっとしていました とても喜んでいました もちろん私も生きててよかったです

(笑)

もちろん命があってよかったです 一方でタリバンの衰退期にも 授業を続けていました 彼らに勢いがあった頃は そうはいきませんでした 私たちは地下に潜り 80人の女子を含む3千人の生徒に 教育の機会を提供し 授業を続けていました

タリバンが弱体化すると 私たちはアフガニスタンに入国し 続々と学校を作りました 女性向けの学習センターも開設しました 診療所も次々に作りました 母親や子どもたちと協力しました 性教育の授業もありました 思いつく限り ありとあらゆる 授業をしたのです とてもうれしかったです 自分の仕事の結果に満足していました ある日 教員4人 警備員1人と共に カブール北部へ向かっていると またしても突然 19人の若い男たちに 路上で足止めをくらったんです 彼らは肩にライフルをかけ 道路を封鎖していました 運転手に「どうしたの?」と聞いても 「わかりません」と答えるばかりです 運転手が話しかけても 男たちは「お前は関係ない」と言い 私の名前を呼んで 「彼女に用がある」の一点張りです 警備員が車から降り 「私が話そう 何の用だ?」と 尋ねました 彼らは「何も」と言い 私の名を呼びました 車の中では 女性たちが泣き喚いていました 私も震え上がって もうだめだと思いました 今度こそ みんな殺される と 絶対そうだと思いました それでも そんな時には 自分の信念と行動から 力が湧いてくるものです 力は心の中にあります 自分の価値を信じれば それが頼りになるのです

だから私は車内のドアに しがみついていましたが 足を震わせながら車から出て 男たちに たずねました 「何の用ですか?」 彼らが何と言ったと思いますか? 「お前のことは知っている どこに行こうとしているかも 毎日 北部を回っているな 女に授業をして 教育して 仕事に就く機会を与えている 技能を身に付けさせている 俺たちにもやってくれないか?」

(笑)

(拍手)

「俺たちが相手ならどうだ? どうしたらいい?」 私は彼らを見て言いました 「わからない」

(笑)

すると彼らは言いました 「別にいいさ 生まれてこの方 俺たちは 銃を手に人を殺すことしか してこなかったし それしか知らないんだ」 どういうことかわかりますよね 当然 罠だと思いました だから その場から去ろうとすると 「行っていい」と言われました そこで車に戻って 席に着き 運転手に言いました 「Uターンして事務所に戻って」 その頃 私たちは 女子の支援しかしていませんでした 授業をする女性への給料と 彼女たちを学校へ派遣する 資金しかなかったのです

事務所に戻った時には 教員はみんな去っていました 逃げ帰ってしまい 誰も残っていなかったんです ただ一人残ったのは警備員だけで 私は言葉を失いました 気を取り直して机の前に座り 「これからどうしよう」と言いました この問題をどう解決するか? というのも 北部での授業は もう始まっていたからです 授業を受けるために 何百人もの女性が集まっていました

私がそこに座っていると きっかけとは まさにこのことでしょう その時 急に 私の支援者の一人が ある報告書のことで電話してきたんです 彼女が「サケナ?」と話しかけ 私は答えました 「あなたらしくないわね どうしたの?」 私は「何でもない」と言って 隠そうとしたんですが 彼女は信じず また尋ねてきます 「一体どうしたの?」 私は全部打ち明けました すると彼女はこう言いました 「次に行く時 彼らに手を貸せばいい あなたは彼らを救えるわ」 2日後に同じ道を行くと 彼らは道の真ん中ではなく 少し引っ込んだ所にいました 前と同じ若い男たちが ライフルを持って立っていて こちらを狙って止めようとするのです だから車を止め 降りて言いました 「わかったわ 一緒に行きましょう」 彼らは「よし」と答えました 私は言いました「一つ条件がある 私の言うことは 何でも聞くこと」 その通りにすると彼らは言いました そこでモスクに連れて行き 話が長くなるので 簡単に言うと 彼らに教員をつけると約束したのです 今では その男たちが 最高の教員になっています 彼らは英語を学び 教員に必要なことを学び コンピュータについて学び 私のガイド役もしてくれます 私たちには分からない山岳地帯の どの場所にも付いて来てくれます 彼らが先行し 私たちが付いて行くんです 彼らが護ってくれるんです そして ―

(拍手)

ありがとう

(拍手)

ここからわかるのは 「教育が人を変える」ということです 人を教育することで 相手は変化します そして現在あらゆる場所で 私たちはジェンダーの平等を 目指す必要があります 女性に研修するだけでなく 男性を忘れてはなりません だって女性を一番苦労させるのは 目の前にいる男性なんですから

(笑)

だから男性向けの授業を始めました というのも 男性は 女性の秘められた能力と 自分たちの能力を知るべきですし 女性たちが男性と同じ仕事を こなせることを知るべきです 私たちは男性への授業を継続し それに強い信念を持っています 私が住む国は かつて美しい所でした これだけは 皆さんに伝えておきたいんです ここは美しい国 ― 美しく平和な国でした 私たちは どこにでも出かけられました 女性は教育を受けていて 法律家やエンジニアや教師になりました 私たちは自由に家を行き来しました ドアに鍵などかけませんでした ところがご存知の通り 私の国に ある事が起こりました 今では屋外を歩くにも 身の安全を心配しなければなりません でも私たちは かつてのアフガニスタンを 取り戻したいのです その一方で 現在アフガニスタンの女性は 本当に一生懸命頑張っています 学位を取り 法律家や 医師になるために 訓練を受けています 教師になる訓練を受け 会社を経営しています 本当に素晴らしいことです そういう人々の才能が開花するのを 目の当たりにできるのですから こういうことが 起こりつつあるんです

それを皆さんに伝えようと思ったのは 愛と共感 ― そして信頼と誠実さの証だからです それさえあれば 人は何かを成し遂げられます マウラーナ・ルーミーという 詩人がいます 彼は 思いやりと愛情を持っていれば 世界を征服できると言っています 私たちにもできるはずです そしてアフガニスタンで できるなら 世界中どこででも 誰にでもできると 100%確信しています

どうもありがとうございました

(拍手)

ありがとう ありがとう

(拍手)

― もっと見る ―
― 折りたたむ ―

品詞分類

  • 主語
  • 動詞
  • 助動詞
  • 準動詞
  • 関係詞等

関連動画