TED日本語 - キャサリン・ヘイホー: 気候変動に対してあなたが出来るいちばん大事なこと

TED日本語

プレゼンテーション動画

TED日本語 - キャサリン・ヘイホー: 気候変動に対してあなたが出来るいちばん大事なこと

TED Talks

気候変動に対してあなたが出来るいちばん大事なこと
The most important thing you can do to fight climate change
キャサリン・ヘイホー
Katharine Hayhoe

内容

気候変動の存在を信じない人に対して、あなたはどのように話をしますか?気候科学者であるキャサリン・ヘイホーは、これまで語りつくされたようなデータや事実とは違った切り口があると言います。この示唆的かつ現実的なプレゼンテーションでは、共通の価値観をもとにして相手と繋がることや、気候変動に対して相手が既に考えていることを気づかせてあげることで、気候変動と闘うための糸口を見つける方法が紹介されています。彼女は言います ― 「私たちは絶望に屈してはいけません。行動を起こして希望を見出す必要があって、それは今日の会話から始まるのです。」

Script

It was my first year as an atmospheric science professor at Texas Tech University. We had just moved to Lubbock, Texas, which had recently been named the second most conservative city in the entire United States. A colleague asked me to guest teach his undergraduate geology class. I said, "Sure." But when I showed up, the lecture hall was cavernous and dark. As I tracked the history of the carbon cycle through geologic time to present day, most of the students were slumped over, dozing or looking at their phones. I ended my talk with a hopeful request for any questions. And one hand shot up right away. I looked encouraging, he stood up, and in a loud voice, he said, "You're a democrat, aren't you?"

(Laughter)

"No," I said, "I'm Canadian."

(Laughter)

(Applause)

That was my baptism by fire into what has now become a sad fact of life here in the United States and increasingly across Canada as well. The fact that the number one predictor of whether we agree that climate is changing, humans are responsible and the impacts are increasingly serious and even dangerous, has nothing to do with how much we know about science or even how smart we are but simply where we fall on the political spectrum.

Does the thermometer give us a different answer depending on if we're liberal or conservative? Of course not. But if that thermometer tells us that the planet is warming, that humans are responsible and that to fix this thing, we have to wean ourselves off fossil fuels as soon as possible -- well, some people would rather cut off their arm than give the government any further excuse to disrupt their comfortable lives and tell them what to do. But saying, "Yes, it's a real problem, but I don't want to fix it," that makes us the bad guy, and nobody wants to be the bad guy. So instead, we use arguments like, "It's just a natural cycle." "It's the sun." Or my favorite, "Those climate scientists are just in it for the money."

(Laughter)

I get that at least once a week. But these are just sciencey-sounding smoke screens, that are designed to hide the real reason for our objections, which have nothing to do with the science and everything to do with our ideology and our identity.

So when we turn on the TV these days, it seems like pundit X is saying, "It's cold outside. Where is global warming now?" And politician Y is saying, "For every scientist who says this thing is real, I can find one who says it isn't." So it's no surprise that sometimes we feel like everybody is saying these myths. But when we look at the data -- and the Yale Program on Climate [ Change ] Communication has done public opinion polling across the country now for a number of years -- the data shows that actually 70 percent of people in the United States agree that the climate is changing. And 70 percent also agree that it will harm plants and animals, and it will harm future generations. But then when we dig down a bit deeper, the rubber starts to hit the road. Only about 60 percent of people think it will affect people in the United States. Only 40 percent of people think it will affect us personally.

And then when you ask people, "Do you ever talk about this?" two-thirds of people in the entire United States say, "Never." And even worse, when you say, "Do you hear the media talk about this?" Over three-quarters of people say no. So it's a vicious cycle. The planet warms. Heat waves get stronger. Heavy precipitation gets more frequent. Hurricanes get more intense. Scientists release yet another doom-filled report. Politicians push back even more strongly, repeating the same sciencey-sounding myths.

What can we do to break this vicious cycle? The number one thing we can do is the exact thing that we're not doing: talk about it. But you might say, "I'm not a scientist. How am I supposed to talk about radiative forcing or cloud parametrization in climate models?" We don't need to be talking about more science; we've been talking about the science for over 150 years. Did you know that it's been 150 years or more since the 1850s, when climate scientists first discovered that digging up and burning coal and gas and oil is producing heat-trapping gases that is wrapping an extra blanket around the planet? That's how long we've known. It's been 50 years since scientists first formally warned a US president of the dangers of a changing climate, and that president was Lyndon B. Johnson. And what's more, the social science has taught us that if people have built their identity on rejecting a certain set of facts, then arguing over those facts is a personal attack. It causes them to dig in deeper, and it digs a trench, rather than building a bridge.

So if we aren't supposed to talk about more science, or if we don't need to talk about more science, then what should we be talking about? The most important thing to do is, instead of starting up with your head, with all the data and facts in our head, to start from the heart, to start by talking about why it matters to us, to begin with genuinely shared values. Are we both parents? Do we live in the same community? Do we enjoy the same outdoor activities: hiking, biking, fishing, even hunting? Do we care about the economy or national security?

For me,one of the most foundational ways I found to connect with people is through my faith. As a Christian, I believe that God created this incredible planet that we live on and gave us responsibility over every living thing on it. And I furthermore believe that we are to care for and love the least fortunate among us, those who are already suffering the impacts of poverty, hunger, disease and more.

If you don't know what the values are that someone has, have a conversation, get to know them, figure out what makes them tick. And then once we have, all we have to do is connect the dots between the values they already have and why they would care about a changing climate. I truly believe, after thousands of conversations that I've had over the past decade and more, that just about every single person in the world already has the values they need to care about a changing climate. They just haven't connected the dots. And that's what we can do through our conversation with them.

The only reason why I care about a changing climate is because of who I already am. I'm a mother, so I care about the future of my child. I live in West Texas, where water is already scarce, and climate change is impacting the availability of that water. I'm a Christian, I care about a changing climate because it is, as the military calls it, a "threat multiplier." It takes those issues, like poverty and hunger and disease and lack of access to clean water and even political crises that lead to refugee crises -- it takes all of these issues and it exacerbates them, it makes them worse.

I'm not a Rotarian. But when I gave my first talk at a Rotary Club, I walked in and they had this giant banner that had the Four-Way Test on it. Is it the truth? Absolutely. Is it fair? Heck, no, that's why I care most about climate change, because it is absolutely unfair. Those who have contributed the least to the problem are bearing the brunt of the impacts. It went on to ask: Would it be beneficial to all, would it build goodwill? Well, to fix it certainly would. So I took my talk, and I reorganized it into the Four-Way Test, and then I gave it to this group of conservative businesspeople in West Texas.

(Laughter)

And I will never forget at the end, a local bank owner came up to me with the most bemused look on his face. And he said, "You know, I wasn't sure about this whole global warming thing, but it passed the Four-Way Test."

(Laughter)

(Applause)

These values, though -- they have to be genuine. I was giving a talk at a Christian college a number of years ago, and after my talk, a fellow scientist came up and he said, "I need some help. I've been really trying hard to get my foot in the door with our local churches, but I can't seem to get any traction. I want to talk to them about why climate change matters." So I said, "Well, the best thing to do is to start with the denomination that you're part of, because you share the most values with those people. What type of church do you attend?" "Oh, I don't attend any church, I'm an atheist," he said.

(Laughter)

I said, "Well, in that case, starting with a faith community is probably not the best idea. Let's talk about what you do enjoy doing, what you are involved in." And we were able to identify a community group that he was part of, that he could start with.

The bottom line is, we don't have to be a liberal tree hugger to care about a changing climate. All we have to be is a human living on this planet. Because no matter where we live, climate change is already affecting us today. If we live along the coasts, in many places, we're already seeing "sunny-day flooding." If we live in western North America, we're seeing much greater area being burned by wildfires. If we live in many coastal locations, from the Gulf of Mexico to the South Pacific, we are seeing stronger hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones, powered by a warming ocean. If we live in Texas or if we live in Syria, we're seeing climate change supersize our droughts, making them more frequent and more severe. Wherever we live, we're already being affected by a changing climate.

So you might say, "OK, that's good. We can talk impacts. We can scare the pants off people, because this thing is serious." And it is, believe me. I'm a scientist, I know.

(Laughter)

But fear is not what is going to motivate us for the long-term, sustained change that we need to fix this thing. Fear is designed to help us run away from the bear. Or just run faster than the person beside us.

(Laughter)

What we need to fix this thing is rational hope. Yes, we absolutely do need to recognize what's at stake. Of course we do. But we need a vision of a better future -- a future with abundant energy, with a stable economy, with resources available to all, where our lives are not worse but better than they are today. There are solutions. And that's why the second important thing that we have to talk about is solutions -- practical, viable, accessible, attractive solutions. Like what? Well, there's no silver bullet, as they say, but there's plenty of silver buckshot.

(Laughter)

There's simple solutions that save us money and reduce our carbon footprint at the same time. Yes, light bulbs. I love my plug-in car. I'd like some solar shingles. But imagine if every home came with a switch beside the front door, that when you left the house, you could turn off everything except your fridge. And maybe the DVR.

(Laughter)

Lifestyle choices: eating local, eating lower down the food chain and reducing food waste, which at the global scale, is one of the most important things that we can do to fix this problem. I'm a climate scientist, so the irony of traveling around to talk to people about a changing climate is not lost on me.

(Laughter)

The biggest part of my personal carbon footprint is my travel. And that's why I carefully collect my invitations. I usually don't go anywhere unless I have a critical mass of invitations in one place -- anywhere from three to four to sometimes even as many as 10 or 15 talks in a given place -- so I can minimize the impact of my carbon footprint as much as possible. And I've transitioned nearly three-quarters of the talks I give to video. Often, people will say, "Well, we've never done that before." But I say, "Well, let's give it a try, I think it could work." Most of all, though, we need to talk about what's already happening today around the world and what could happen in the future.

Now, I live in Texas, and Texas has the highest carbon emissions of any state in the United States. You might say, "Well, what can you talk about in Texas?" The answer is: a lot. Did you know that in Texas there's over 25,000 jobs in the wind energy industry? We are almost up to 20 percent of our electricity from clean, renewable sources, most of that wind, though solar is growing quickly. The largest army base in the United States, Fort Hood, is, of course, in Texas. And they've been powered by wind and solar energy now, because it's saving taxpayers over 150 million dollars. Yes.

(Applause)

What about those who don't have the resources that we have? In sub-Saharan Africa, there are hundreds of millions of people who don't have access to any type of energy except kerosine, and it's very expensive. Around the entire world, the fastest-growing type of new energy today is solar. And they have plenty of solar. So social impact investors, nonprofits, even corporations are going in and using innovative new microfinancing schemes, like, pay-as-you-go solar, so that people can buy the power they need in increments, sometimes even on their cell phone. One company, Azuri, has distributed tens of thousands of units across 11 countries, from Rwanda to Uganda. They estimate that they've powered over 30 million hours of electricity and over 10 million hours of cell phone charging.

What about the giant growing economies of China and India? Well, climate impacts might seem a little further down the road, but air quality impacts are right here today. And they know that clean energy is essential to powering their future. So China is investing hundreds of billions of dollars in clean energy. They're flooding coal mines, and they're putting floating solar panels on the surface. They also have a panda-shaped solar farm.

(Applause)

(Laughter)

Yes, they're still burning coal. But they've shut down all the coal plants around Beijing. And in India, they're looking to replace a quarter of a billion incandescent light bulbs with LEDs, which will save them seven billion dollars in energy costs. They're investing in green jobs, and they're looking to decarbonize their entire vehicle fleet. India may be the first country to industrialize without relying primarily on fossil fuels.

The world is changing. But it just isn't changing fast enough. Too often, we picture this problem as a giant boulder sitting at the bottom of a hill, with only a few hands on it, trying to roll it up the hill. But in reality, that boulder is already at the top of the hill. And it's got hundreds of millions of hands, maybe even billions on it, pushing it down. It just isn't going fast enough. So how do we speed up that giant boulder so we can fix climate change in time? You guessed it. The number one way is by talking about it.

The bottom line is this: climate change is affecting you and me right here, right now, in the places where we live. But by working together, we can fix it. Sure, it's a daunting problem. Nobody knows that more than us climate scientists. But we can't give in to despair. We have to go out and actively look for the hope that we need, that will inspire us to act. And that hope begins with a conversation today.

Thank you.

(Applause)

私が大気科学の教授として テキサス工科大学に着任した その1年目の出来事です 私は家族を連れて テキサス州の ラボック市へ引っ越しました 当時 ラボック市はアメリカ全土で 最も保守的な都市 第2位だったそうです 同僚から学部生向けの地質学の授業での 特別授業を頼まれたので 快諾しました しかし いざ講堂に入ってみると 暗く 洞窟のようでした 私が 地質時代から現在までの 炭素循環の歴史について 説明している間 ほとんどの生徒は 机に突っ伏したり 居眠りをしたり あるいは 携帯をいじったりしていました 講義を終えて 質問がないか尋ねると 即座に手を挙げた学生がいました これは良い反応だと思ったのですが 学生は立ち上がって 大声で こう言いました 「あなたは 民主党員なんですね?」

(笑)

私は答えました 「いいえ カナダ人です」

(笑)

(拍手)

この出来事は ここアメリカの 悲しい現実を表しており 私にとっての厳しい試練と受け止めました カナダでも 同様の考え方が徐々に浸透していました 気候は変動しており その原因は人類で 影響は危険なほど重大であるという事実に ある人が同意するかどうかは その人が科学にどれだけ精通しているか あるいは どれだけ理知的かと言うことではなく 単純にその人の政治的立場が 最も重要な予測因子なのです

温度計は 使う人が リベラルか保守派かで 違う温度を示すでしょうか? そんなはず ありませんよね しかし その温度計が 地球の気温が上昇していて その原因が人類であり それを直すためには 直ちに化石燃料の使用を 止めるべきだと示すとなると ― 今の快適な生活を中断して 何をすべきか指図する口実を 政府に与えるくらいなら 腕を切り落とす方がましだという人が いるのです だからといって「それは問題だけど 直す気はありません」 としらばっくれたら 悪者になってしまいます 誰も悪者にはなりたくないですよね 代わりに こんな議論が使われます 「それは自然の周期だ」 「それは太陽の問題だ」 もしくは 私のお気に入りのフレーズは 「気候学者の金稼ぎだ」

(笑)

最低 一週間に一回は言われます これらは 単なる疑似科学的な煙幕で 私たちが反対する本当の理由が隠されています それは 科学とは無関係で 私たちのイデオロギーと アイデンティティーに関係します

最近では テレビをつけると 専門家のXさんが言います 「外はとても寒い 温暖化はどこで起きているのだろうか?」 そして 政治家Yさんは言います 「温暖化は事実だと言う科学者がいれば それを否定する科学者も同数います」 だから まるで神話のように 感じても 無理のないことです しかし データを見れば分かります ― イェール大学の 気候変動に関する調査プログラムが 何年にもわたり 全国の世論調査をしたところ 70パーセントのアメリカの国民が 気候変動のあることに同意しました そして70パーセントが 動植物や 将来の人類に悪影響があることに 同意しました しかし そこから さらに掘り下げると 現実問題に 突き当たりました 60パーセントの人しか アメリカの国民に影響があると考えていません たった40パーセントの人しか 自分たちに影響があると考えていません

そして 「このことについて 誰かと話をしたことがあるか?」 との質問に アメリカ全体で3分の2の人が 「一度もない」と答えました さらに悪い事に 「メディアを通じて聞いたことがあるか?」 との質問に 4分の3以上が 「いいえ」と答えました これは悪循環です 地球は温暖化します 猛暑はどんどん過酷になっています 豪雨はより頻繁になっています ハリケーンはより強烈になっています 科学者はなお地球の運命に警告を発します 政治家はそれに よりいっそう強く反発して 同様の 疑似科学神話を繰り返します

この悪循環を断ち切るには 一体何ができるでしょうか? 今していないことの中に 一番大事なことがあります 話すことです 「私は科学者ではない」 とおっしゃるかもしれません 「気候モデルにもとづいて 放射強制や雲のパラメーター化を 議論しろというのか?」 いいえ 更なる科学的議論は不要です もう150年以上もやっていますから 今更 要りません 今から150年以上前の1850年代には 化石燃料やガスや石油を採掘して燃やすと 温室効果ガスが発生して 地球を毛布で覆うのと 同じ現象が起きるということが 既に発見されていたとご存知でしょうか? そのくらい長い間 認知されていたことなのです 科学者が 初めてアメリカ大統領に 気候の変化を正式に警告してから 既に50年がたちました 当時の大統領は リンドン・ジョンソンでした そのうえ 社会科学が教えてくれたことは もし人々が 一連の真実を拒否することを 彼らのアイデンティティとするなら それらの事実について言い争うことは 個人攻撃になるということです 従って 議論を深く掘り下げていくと 架け橋を作るどころか 塹壕を作ってしまうのです

もし 科学的な会話を すべきでないのであれば 科学的な会話が不必要ならば 何について話せばよいのでしょうか? 最も大切なことは データや事実をもとに 頭で考えることから始めるのではなく 心から始めることです なぜ気候変動が重要かについて 共通する価値観から始めるのです 私たちは親同士であるとか 同じ地域に住んでいるとか ハイキング、サイクリング、釣り、猟など 同じ趣味をもっているとか 経済や国家の安全に関心があるか等から 始めましょう

私の場合 他人との共通点を見つける 最も基本的な方法は 信仰を通してです 私はクリスチャンです 神がこの素晴らしい地球を作り ― 私たちに全ての生物の責任を負わせたと 信じています さらに 私たちは 最も不幸な人 ― 例えば 貧困や飢餓や病気などで 苦しんでいる人に 気を配り 愛するべきだと信じています

もしも相手の価値観がわからないのであれば 会話することで相手を理解し 相手が何に興味を持つか探るのです それをつかんだら 彼らの価値観と気候変動の問題を つなげていくのです ここ10年以上で何千人もの方と 話をしてきて この世界の一人一人が 気候変動について配慮の必要があるという 価値観を 持っていると 心から信じています 彼らはまだそれらを 線で繋いでいないだけです それが会話を通してできることです

私が気候の変化を心配する理由は 自分が既にそういう人間だからです 私は母親なので 子供の将来が心配です 私はウエスト・テキサスに住んでいて そこではすでに水が不足しているので 気候の変化が水不足に与える影響が心配です 私はクリスチャンなので 軍事的に「脅威を増幅させるもの」と呼ばれる 気候変動が心配です 貧困と飢餓や病気 そして衛生的な水へのアクセスが 不足していることや ひいては 難民危機まで起こしている 政治的危機 それらは全てに関係し 更に問題を悪化させます

私はロータリアンではありませんが 初めてロータリークラブで話をしたときに 中に進むと大きな幕があって 「4つのテスト」と書かれてありました 「それは真実か?」 もちろん 「それは公平か?」 そんなわけない 私が気候変動に対して最も心配していることは 完全に不公平だからです 最も問題の原因になっていない人が 最もひどい影響を受けているからです つづいて 「みんなのためになるか」 「 好意を深めるか」 気候変動を直すことは そうだと思います だから 私は話の内容を 「4つのテスト」に組み直して それを ウエスト・テキサスの 保守的な実業家たちに お話しして差し上げました

(笑)

私が忘れもしないのは 終りに 銀行の頭取がやってきて 困惑した表情で私に言ったことです 「私は 地球温暖化について すべてを知っているわけではないですが 4つのテストをクリアしていることは わかりました」

(笑)

(拍手)

それらの価値は 本物でなくてはなりません 私はクリスチャンの大学で 何年も前に講演をしたことがあります 講演のあとに ある科学者がやって来て言いました 「ご助力ください 地元の教会の方とお話ししようと これまでかなりの努力をしてきましたが どうも上手くいきません 気候変動がなぜ大事な問題であるかと お話したいのです」 私は言いました 「一番良い方法は まずは あなたの宗派の教会から 始めることだと思いますよ あなたが価値観を 最も共有する人達だから あなたはどの宗派の教会に 参加しているのですか?」 「いえ 私は無神論者なので どの教会にも通っていません」

(笑)

「そうすると 信仰の集まりから始めるのは あまり良い案ではないかもしれないですね あなたが楽しいと思うもの 関わっているものは何ですか」 彼が所属していて そこから始められる あるコミュニティーグループを 特定できました

結論から言うと 気候変動について考えるにあたって 極端な環境重視のリベラルである 必要はないのです 地球に住む人間であるというだけで十分です なぜなら どこに住んでいようとも 気候変動はすでに 私たちに影響しているからです 海岸沿いに住んでいれば 「晴れの日の洪水」を すでに多くの場所で見ています 北米西部に住んでいれば 広大な地域での山火事を見ています メキシコ湾から南太平洋までの 多くの湾岸地域では 温まった海により勢力を増し 以前より強力になった ハリケーンや台風 サイクロンに遭います テキサスやシリアに住んでいれば 気候変動が干ばつを巨大化し より頻繁に より深刻にするのを見ます どこに住んでいようと 私たちはすでに気候変動の影響を受けています

そして 「いいでしょう では気候変動の影響について話しましょう これは深刻な問題なので 人々を怖がらせられます」と始めるのです 実際 そうなんです 私は科学者なので知ってます

(笑)

しかし 恐怖は 私たちを動機づけるものではありません 長時間にわたる 継続する変化を 私たちはどうにかしないといけません 恐怖は私たちを 怖いものから逃げさせます これは 隣の人より 早く走っているだけかもしれませんが

(笑)

私たちは 未来につながる希望を 持てるようにならないといけません 何が危機にさらされているか しっかり理解する必要があります もちろんそうします しかし 私たちには より良い未来のビジョンが必要です 豊富なエネルギーのある未来 安定した経済 そして皆が利用できる資源 私たちの生活が悪化するのではなく 今日より良いという未来です 解決方法はあります そしてそれが 語り合うべき2番目に大切なことが 解決方法であることの理由です 実践的で実行可能 手頃で魅力的な解決方法です どんな? いわゆる特効薬はないかもしれません 数を撃てば当たるような方法は いくつもあります

(笑)

お金の節約と同時にCO2排出を減らせる シンプルな方法があります そうです 電球です 私の愛車は充電式自動車なので ソーラーパネルが欲しいと思っています しかし 全ての家の玄関横に 電気スイッチがあることを想像して下さい 家を出る前に 冷蔵庫以外の 全てのスイッチをオフにできます たぶんDVDレコーダーも

(笑)

ライフスタイルの選択:地元の食材 食物連鎖の下位のものを食べること 食物廃棄を減らし これを世界規模で行うことは この問題に対してできる 最も大事なことです 私は気候科学者です だから 気候変動について講演をするために 各地をまわることの皮肉な側面は よくわかります

(笑)

私の個人的な二酸化炭素排出源は 出張です だから私は 招待をまとめて受けるようにしています 通常 1か所あたり 3~4の招待を最低限として それ以下の場合には 行かないことにしています ときにはあるところで 10~15講演することもあります そうやって私は できるだけ 私のCO2排出量を 減らすようにしています 講演の4分の3くらいは ビデオに替えました 「そんなのやった事ありません」 言われると 「では やってみましょう うまくいくと思いますから」と答えます でも 多くの場合には 既に世界で起きていること 将来起き得るうることを 話す必要があります

私は今 テキサスに住んでいます テキサスは米国で 最もCO2排出量の多い州です こう言われるかもしれません 「テキサスで何を話せますか?」と その答えは 「たくさん」です テキサスでは25,000人以上が 風力発電に関する仕事についていることを ご存知でしょうか? 私たちは最大20パーセントの電力を クリーンで再生可能な 風力発電から得ています 太陽光発電も負けてはいません 米国で最大の軍事基地は フォート・フッドで もちろん テキサスにあります 今や ここでは 風力や太陽光から電気を得ていて 1億5千万ドル以上の 公的支出を削減しています そうです

(拍手)

私たちのような資源を持っていない国は どうするのでしょうか? サブサハラアフリカでは何億人もの人が 灯油以外の燃料へのアクセスがありません しかも それはとても高価です 地球全体で 最も急速に成長している新エネルギーは 太陽光です 太陽光はふんだんにあります ですから 社会インパクト投資家や 非営利団体や企業までもが 参入して 使用分だけ料金を払うような 新しいマイクロファイナンス方式で 必要な分だけ電気を買えるようにしています 時に携帯電話の充電にも使われます Azuriという会社は ルワンダからウガンダにわたる11か国に 何万台ものユニットを流通させました 3千万時間以上の電力と 1千万時間以上の携帯電話充電の電力を 供給したと見積られます

中国やインドのような 巨大な経済成長国はどうでしょうか? 気候への影響は しばらく先のことかもしれません しかし 大気汚染は今日の問題です クリーンエネルギーは必須であることを 彼らは理解しています そのため中国はクリーンエネルギーに 何千億ドルもの投資をしています 彼らは炭鉱を水没させ 表面にソーラーパネルを浮かべます パンダ形のソーラー発電所もあるんです

(拍手)

(笑)

そう 彼らはまだ石炭を燃しています しかし 北京周辺の 石炭を使う工場はすべて閉鎖しました インドでは2億5千万個の白熱電球を LEDに変えようとしています 70億ドルもの電気代の節約になります 彼らは無公害の仕事に投資をしています そして 自動車を CO2排出ゼロにしようとしています 恐らくインドは 化石燃料への依存なしに 工業化する 最初の国でしょう

世界は 変わりつつあります しかし その速さが足りません よく この問題を 丘のふもとにある大きな石に模して たった数人で 丘の頂上まで転がして 持ち上げようとしていると考えます しかし実際は 石はすでに丘の頂上にあります そして何億人もの人が もしかしたら10億人もの人が それを落とそうとしています だから どうしても 変化の スピードが足りません では 気候変動の対処に間に合うように 大きな石を持ち上げるにはどうすれば良いか? おわかりでしょう 最も大事なのは 語り合うことです

結論としては 気候変動は あなたや私 それぞれの住んでいる場所で 今まさに影響を与えています 協力すれば 対処できます それは大仕事に違いありません 気候科学者よりも それに詳しい人はいません しかし絶望に屈することはできません 私たちは外に向かい 我々に必要で 行動を鼓舞する希望を 積極的に探すことが必要です その希望は 今日の会話から生まれます

ありがとうございました

(拍手)

― もっと見る ―
― 折りたたむ ―

品詞分類

  • 主語
  • 動詞
  • 助動詞
  • 準動詞
  • 関係詞等

関連動画